Health

When a UTI Means More: How to Tell if Your Infection Should be Taken More Seriously

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If you are female, there is a good chance you will get a UTI at some point in your lifetime. Many women have regular infections and deal with pain and discomfort for days or weeks at a time. Whether it’s your first or fifth infection, there are ways you can prevent UTI, diagnose one or have one treated. If your infection is left untreated for too long, the bacteria can move from your urethra to your kidneys and may cause serious problems.

UTI or Kidney Infection?

Most women notice they have a UTI when they start feeling the urge to urinate frequently although little comes out. Urination is also painful and there is a burning sensation every time you go. While these symptoms seem harmless enough, the reality is that they can quickly turn dangerous. If you have a UTI and wonder if you should worry about it moving to your kidneys, look for the following signs or symptoms.

  • Painful and frequent urination
  • Dark, cloudy, foul-smelling or bloody urine
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Pain in the side, groin or back
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea

If a kidney infection is left untreated, it can lead to sepsis, which causes the organs to fail and can be life-threatening. Kidney infections that become chronic can also cause permanent kidney damage.

How to Prevent UTIs

Those who want UTI prevention without antibiotics can employ several techniques to decrease their chances of infection:

  • Urinate frequently
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Wipe front to back
  • Always urinate after sex
  • Drink a UTI prevention drink with all natural ingredients during your trigger time
  • Avoid taking baths

UTIs are often caused by exercise or sexual intercourse. Most women can pinpoint the cause of the UTI and avoid it as much as possible. When you find something that works for you, utilize it regularly to avoid the possible painful repercussions of a bladder infection.

When a UTI Means More: How to Tell if Your Infection Should be Taken More Seriously

If you are female, there is a good chance you will get a UTI at some point in your lifetime. Many women have regular infections and deal with pain and discomfort for days or weeks at a time. Whether it’s your first or fifth infection, there are ways you can prevent UTI, diagnose one or have one treated. If your infection is left untreated for too long, the bacteria can move from your urethra to your kidneys and may cause serious problems.

UTI or Kidney Infection?

Most women notice they have a UTI when they start feeling the urge to urinate frequently although little comes out. Urination is also painful and there is a burning sensation every time you go. While these symptoms seem harmless enough, the reality is that they can quickly turn dangerous. If you have a UTI and wonder if you should worry about it moving to your kidneys, look for the following signs or symptoms.

  • Painful and frequent urination
  • Dark, cloudy, foul-smelling or bloody urine
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Pain in the side, groin or back
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea

If a kidney infection is left untreated, it can lead to sepsis, which causes the organs to fail and can be life-threatening. Kidney infections that become chronic can also cause permanent kidney damage.

How to Prevent UTIs

Those who want UTI prevention without antibiotics can employ several techniques to decrease their chances of infection:

  • Urinate frequently
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Wipe front to back
  • Always urinate after sex
  • Drink a UTI prevention drink with all natural ingredients during your trigger time
  • Avoid taking baths

UTIs are often caused by exercise or sexual intercourse. Most women can pinpoint the cause of the UTI and avoid it as much as possible. When you find something that works for you, utilize it regularly to avoid the possible painful repercussions of a bladder infection.

 

 

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