Protect Your Skin This Summer

naomi2Dr. Naomi Dolly graduated from St. Joseph’s Convent High School in Trinidad and Tobago. She enrolled in the Faculty of Medical Sciences in 2002  at The University of West Indes on a Further Additional Scholarship from the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Her successful completion of Medical School with multiple distinctions and honors in various modules, led to the strong foundation in starting her residency in dermatology in SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York in July of 2011. This was preceded by her one year internship at the Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, New York in internal medicine.
In June 2014, Dr. Dolly completed her residency in dermatology and became a board-certified dermatologist following the certifying examination. She has always been passionate for medicine and her love for dermatology started in her final year of medical school. This love has continued to grow as she enjoys spending time with her patients, getting to know their medical conditions, as well as getting to know their families.

She is dedicated to helping her patients achieve and maintain their healthiest skin potential. In addition to treating the “bread and butter” of dermatology, Dr. Dolly takes special interest in patients with connective tissue diseases and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. She is a current fellow at NYU Medical Center in advanced medical dermatology. She stays current on the latest breakthroughs in medical treatments, and cosmetic procedures to help provide the most advanced treatment options for her patients. She is a current member of The American Academy of Dermatology, The Medical Dermatology Society, The Caribbean Dermatology Association, as well as the Women’s Dermatology Society.

Though most of her career in dermatology thus far has been in the United States, she gained a wealth of experience treating patients of the Caribbean diaspora during her residency in Flatbush Brooklyn, NY. It was there she was able to blend her prior knowledge of health care learned during her years as a medical student with the health care practices and standards of the United States. She wishes to extend her expertise to her home country of Trinidad and Tobago with hopes of eventually impacting the skin care practices and management of the other Caribbean countries. Dr. Dolly looks forward to developing a long relationship with all of her patients and invites you to peruse our website or contact us for more information about our practice, the conditions that we treat, and the services that we offer.

Looking for ways to protect your skin this summer?

After this long, hard winter, it is time to show a little more skin. Pack away your winter coats to the back of your closet and get your bare skin out in the sun for a breath of fresh air.

Spring and summer are the perfect seasons for all of the outdoor activities. – And everyone loves an excuse to bask in the sun. People love it. Whether it’s hiking, biking, camping, or just beachin’ it, our skin is out and feels the heat. Although people love the enrichment of Vitamin D, this poses serious problems for various and all skin types.

By embracing the beauty of nature, you may actually be causing irreversible damage to your beautiful skin!

Expert dermatologist, Naomi Dolly, isn’t expecting people to deny their inner urge for lusting after their ultimate bronze or outside fun, so she helps to break down some tips to protect your skin all summer long!

#5 Proper Sun Screen

Technically, you should be wearing sunscreen all year round. Just ask the leading experts. Sunscreen is the only thing that can block the UV rays from directly hitting your skin. It is extremely important to wear a sun screen that offers a wide range of protection. Read the label and make sure it says “broad spectrum converge” and a SPF of  >/=30 before purchasing. Water Proof, Sweat Proof, and other elements and ingredients may all play huge factors in the strength of protection from your sun blocker. Always reapply sun screen after coming out of the water or after 4 hours of basking in the sun.

#4 Clothing and Fabrics

Sun screen is not the only way to protect our skin. Wearing the appropriate clothing, including hats, made from tightly woven fabrics will be a solid defense for your skin against increasing damage from our beloved Vitamin D rays. Stand in the shade where ever and whenever possible. Use umbrellas can be another powerful tool!

Fashion Tip of The Day: Wide brimmed hats are key on extremely sunny days. They not only provide shade which can protect your face, they are so on trend right now! Pair it with some big bug-eyed frames and look fierce while you bask in a healthy glow.

#3 Moisturize

Moisturizers assist with dry skin, acne, and premature wrinkling. The ingredient, Vitamin E is the ultimate element to boosting skin protection. It is an imperative part of optimal daily skincare. If ointments and creams seem too thick, use lotions. Apply your moisturizer to your skin soon after showering to keep the moisture locked in and receive the most benefit.

#2 Don’t Pop

If you are a person who deals with acne, do not pop your acne lesions or pimples. This can be difficult as often times it seems to be irresistible and the immediate solution to alleviate the problem. Though this may be a quick fix to get rid of them faster, it will increase your chance of permanent scarring and irreversible blotches.

#1 Manage Your Stress

Increasing higher stress levels tend to contribute and often times set off acne out-breaks, rosacea flares and hair loss. The professionals are giving you yet another reason to take a moment for yourself. Can’t beat that advice. Unwind and relax, after all your health and beauty depends on it. Take the time to learn to recognize when exactly you are most stressed and actively take initiative to reduce this. Set reasonable limits. Scale back your to-do list and make time to do the things you enjoy.

For more information on optimal skincare health contact Naomi Dolly at

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